Category: OER philosophy

The Evolution of Rebus Community’s Licensing Policy

OER philosophy Rebus Community

Since the inception of Rebus, we’ve worked closely with the OER community to ensure that everything we do is informed by the values of the people we support. In addition, we aim to advocate for those values, build them into our tools and processes, and remain responsive to evolving attitudes and ideas as we allKeep reading “The Evolution of Rebus Community’s Licensing Policy”

Opening Up a Can of… Marketing

OER philosophy

What might it mean to do ‘open marketing’? Would it involve being anti-strategic? Foregrounding mechanisms to opt out and ignore messaging? Making advertising and promotional materials that can be reused and repurposed? Demonstrating clarity, accessibility, and absolute truth on Twitter? Said another way, does open twist the objectives of marketing, or does it elicit newKeep reading “Opening Up a Can of… Marketing”

The (non-profit) business of connecting people through technology

OER philosophy

While we aren’t Facebook (we really, really aren’t), we are in the (non-profit) business of connecting people through technology. That’s not something we take lightly. We understand that the technologies we choose and the platform we create will shape interactions, for better or worse, as much as many other decisions we make.

A Shared Belief in Publishing Openly

OER philosophy open textbook projects

Rebus Community is in many ways a perfect bridge between publishing, education, academia, and knowledge exchange—a collective effort that makes a tangible difference in people’s lives. As Publishing Liaison, my role is to provide support and guidance to those working on open textbook projects. The specifics vary from team to team, but the through lineKeep reading “A Shared Belief in Publishing Openly”

Making books to build communities, building communities to make books.

news OER philosophy

Brewster Kahle, of the Internet Archive, gave a talk back in 2004 titled, “Universal Access to All Human Knowledge,” arguing that new web technologies could help realize a world in which all knowledge would be available to anyone for free. Brewster’s vision was a core inspiration for the past decade and a half of myKeep reading “Making books to build communities, building communities to make books.”

Stay up to date!